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Public Sector Program Management – A Vision for the Future

About the Challenge
If you are creative, if you are a visionary, and if you care about good government, then the Performance Improvement Council wants to hear from you. Share with us, and the world, your vision of the future of public sector program management - and help build the government of the 21st century.

Posted By: General Services Administration
Category: Ideas
Submission Dates: 12 a.m. ET, May 13, 2014 - 1:59 p.m. ET, May 30, 2014 Public Voting Dates: 12 a.m. ET, May 13, 2014 - 1:59 p.m. ET, Jun 06, 2014 Winners Announced: Jun 30, 2014


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Planning, project management, financial management, employee engagement, and reporting are among the key responsibilities of today’s public sector program managers. The approach to each of these and so many others is defined, in part, by the state of existing technology, access to data, and the ability of a skilled workforce to take full advantage of those resources.  Today’s tools and resources both enable and limit program managers’ ability to deliver the best service to the public, efficiently and within budget, while adjusting to changes in political direction and mission focus.  You understand the critical importance of communication and information processing technology, the value of quality and timely data, and the cost of recruiting, training, and retaining top quality talent.  And you can help shape the conversation about the coming direction of public sector program management.

How will the work of public sector program managers change over the next 25 years?  How should it change?  How can it change with thoughtful steering?

The Performance Improvement Council wants to hear from you.  Look ahead 25 years and let us know what you see.

GUIDELINES

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Your entry should describe where you think the field of public sector program management will be in 25 years.  You may choose to illustrate your vision with a scenario that reaches ahead to the year 2039.  Or you may describe your vision in more general terms.  Either way, use your foresight and be creative.  Note that today’s kindergartners will be well on their way to established careers in business and government in 25 years.  And today’s teenagers will be moving into positions of senior leadership, reshaping the way the world does business.

Although you should consider how advances in technology and the skill set of a new generation will drive the development of public sector program management, your entry need not address any particular issue or question.  Imagine how the work of government program managers will evolve, and describe what you see.  We’re interested in your vision.

The appendix at the bottom of this page contains brief profiles of four government program managers and some of the challenges they faced in 2014.  These profiles are an entirely optional resource for your benefit.  Use them if you find them helpful in focusing your thoughts, but do not let them limit your creativity.  Your entry need not refer to any of the themes discussed in these profiles.

As a starter, you may click here to get ideas for your submission.

AFTER THE CHALLENGE – WHAT’S NEXT?

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The General Services Administration (GSA) and the Performance Improvement Council expect this challenge to kick off an ongoing dialog about current trends and challenges in public sector program management, what tomorrow promises, and how today’s managers can position themselves and their organizations for future success.  GSA will feature winning entries on both the challenge homepage and on the GSA website.  GSA will also invite contest winners to participate in a moderated and recorded Google Hangout conversation, and may highlight ideas from one or more winning entries in a follow-up contest.

Judges
Christine Heflin
Director of Performance Excellence, U.S. Department of Commerce
Nancy J. Martinez
Associate Commissioner, Office of Income Security Programs, U.S. Social Security Administration
Bethany Blakey
Performance Manager, The Performance Improvement Council, U.S. General Services Administration
John M. Kamensky, technical adviser to judges
Senior Fellow and Associate Partner, IBM Center for The Business of Government
Max Stier, technical adviser to judges
President and CEO, Partnership for Public Service
Judging Criteria

Originality - 35%

Judges will award up to 35 points for originality. An original vision will see beyond or around the path defined by a linear extension of current trends in technology, the scope and nature of program managers’ responsibilities, the workplace environment, or the professional competencies of program managers. An original vision will identify new or emerging trends that have the potential to transform the field.

Clarity - 35%

Judges will award up to 35 points to entries that offer a clear and coherent vision of the future. Where originality demands imagination, clarity calls for focus and structure. Contestants will be awarded points for clarity to the extent that they offer a coherent view of the future and a convincing argument for how we’ll get there.

Presentation - 30%

Judges will award up to 30 points to entries for readability and style. Because GSA hopes to feature winning entries on its website and in other forums, judges will award the most points in this category to well-written and engaging entries that are likely to capture and hold the attention of a general audience.

How to Enter

Register and submit your entry from this site between May 13, 2014 and May 30, 2014 (01:59 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time).

At registration you will be prompted for your name and contact information. The contest is open to both individuals and teams. If entering as a team, you will enter your team’s name and the email address of your team leader.  The names of your team members and team leader should be entered as a separate attached file.  Registered contestants and team leaders will receive contest updates by email.

PUBLIC COMMENT AND VOTING

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GSA encourages visitors to the contest website to review entries, offer comments, and vote for their favorites. The comment and voting process offers you an opportunity to contribute to the dialog.

  • Entries received from eligible contestants will be posted to the contest website after GSA determines that they comply with the contest’s Terms and Conditions. Once an entry is posted to the contest website, website visitors will be able to view, comment, and vote on that entry.
  • The voting period will extend one week beyond the deadline for submission of entries in order to give visitors an opportunity to view, comment, and vote on all posted entries.
  • Visitors may cast up to one vote for each entry, including their own.
  • Visitors will vote by awarding up to 5 stars, with each star representing one point.

 

APPENDIX – Profiles of Public Sector Program Managers – ca. 2014

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Program managers in the public sector are a diverse group.  They confront an extraordinary range of challenges in mission areas as diverse as regulatory compliance, basic research, service delivery, law enforcement, and military preparedness, to name just a few.  While many are unique to a particular program mission, some challenges tend to be shared by all program managers.

The following profiles offer a snapshot of the immediate challenges faced by four government program managers.  These challenges are defined in part by the tools and resources available to address them.  They are defined, as well, by current expectations of what government can and should do.  As expectations change, and as technology and workplace skills evolve, the nature of these challenges will change as well.

Profile 1 – regulatory compliance

Trina is a program manager with a Federal Government regulatory agency.  She leads an office that writes policy, processes industry applications for licenses, and tracks routine industry reporting in support of the agency’s industry compliance efforts.  The office also conducts inspections to ensure industry compliance with laws and policy.  In the 20 years that Trina has spent with the Government, the work of her office has been transformed by historic advances in online and data processing technologies.  Although the agency’s compliance efforts are more effective than at any point in the past, Trina recognizes the need to develop more sophisticated approaches to keep up with a rapidly evolving industry and an increasingly complicated regulatory environment.

Profile 2 – service delivery

Henry manages a program that benefits low income households.  Removing barriers to participation by eligible households is central to the program’s purpose.  At the same time the program is committed to eliminating payments to ineligible recipients. Henry believes that facilitating access to benefits and strengthening program integrity need not compete against each other; greater understanding of the factors that lead to improper certification for program benefits might be useful in developing strategies to reach the unserved eligible population.  Henry has challenged his staff and program partners to draw on their diversity of skills and perspectives to come up with ideas that advance both goals simultaneously so that 25 years from now the present tension between the two is replaced with a relationship of positive and mutual reinforcement.  Welcome to the team!

Profile 3 – grants management

Ty oversees an office that awards and administers grants to community-based social service organizations.  As part of an ongoing effort to maximize the agency’s return on investment, Ty’s office is awarding more grants to organizations that promise innovative approaches to service delivery.  Many of those organizations are first-time recipients of government grants.  Although Ty and his staff are encouraged by early signs of success, they recognize the need for careful oversight and evaluation.  They also recognize that new models of service delivery may call for changes in the way that the office collects and analyzes program data.  Responding to these challenges is critical to ensuring that management of the grant-making process does not stand in the way of grantee-led program innovation.

Profile 4 – law enforcement

Sami was recently hired by her city’s chief of police to review the organization’s case prioritization approach.  She is faced with the dilemma of meeting higher expectations for successful criminal prosecution/crime reduction/agility in response to emerging threats without any increase in enforcement and civilian staff.  She is expected to do so in a more transparent manner and to further complicate things, the budget is shrinking.  Sami is reaching out to other law enforcement agencies to learn what they are doing that she may be able to replicate but she also believes that new, innovative approaches are necessary to meet expectations in the long run.  She is actually more concerned about internal resistance to trying new approaches than she is about anything else.

Winners
Best Overall Judges will select a Best Overall entry according to the Judging Criteria. Judges may select up to two entries not recognized in another category for Honorable Mention based on the same criteria.

The Best Overall entry, and winning entries in the categories below, will be recognized on the contest and GSA websites. GSA will invite contest winners to participate in a moderated event about the future of program management, and may feature winning entries in a follow-up contest.
Won by: Douglas Clark
Solution: The Lexeme Way to Mars
Description: Please access this submission on the 'Solutions' tab.
Most Popular The entry that receives the highest average rating from among the five entries with the greatest number of votes received from visitors to the contest website will be recognized as the Most Popular. Won by: Peter Lee
Solution: Public Service 25 years from today – The year is 2039 – What will Public Sector Program Management Work look like? - abridged
Description: Please access this submission on the 'Solutions' tab.
Most Original Judges may select an entry not recognized in another category as the Most Original based on the criteria for “originality” outlined under Judging Criteria. Won by: Team Robot (Mary Didier, Christopher Ruper, and Andrea Sparks-Ibanga)
Solution: 2039: Program Management...and ROBOTS!
Description: Please access this submission on the 'Solutions' tab.

26 Discussions for "Public Sector Program Management – A Vision for the Future"

  • Show Replies [+]
    Scott
    Also made a submission on the 30th and was given the "submission successful" screen but it is not showing yet. Just the same 17 as Friday. Was it received? Can I resubmit?

  • Show Replies [+]
    Mike
    I submitted an entry earlier this week, but it is not showing up. And I haven't heard anything back from anyone as to why mine didn't make the list. Who/how to I contact someone to find out why? Thanks.

  • Show Replies [+]
    Hi.. Twice today I submitted my suggestion. Although the system notes it as submitted, I have not seen it posted. I did not write a specific section reflecting 2039, as I believe that a) the core principles I have outlined in my suggestion will still be valid then; and b) while I could say that in 2039, all government agencies will transparently meet or exceed all citizen and stakeholder needs; that transactions will be anticipated and met in "zero-stop" service (posited by Singapore's Chan Meng Khoong over ten years ago), and that both employee and citizen satisfaction with government will garner consistent excellent ratings. The challenge of what is called "backcasting" or "future backwards" is to then explain how we got to an envisioned future state. That in turn, requires a sufficient human sensor network- people in the system- making sense of the vision, and creating a joint narrative to achieve the vision. I would ask the intention of the challenge folks in asking for the 2039 predictions. I think often about improved future states, but believe we need the right core operating values and principles, combined with strategically-aligned action, and continuous feedback/learning/adaptive loops, to sustain improvement over time. Thanks!

  • Show Replies [+]
    Kate Horn
    I have colleagues in different locations that are attempting to vote on desktops using FireFox and Chrome and are having issues. They were, however, able to vote successfully using a mobile device. Is anyone else experiencing similar issues?

    • Reply
      Thom Feucht
      Yes, several more folks here in my office report being blocked from voting. It appears that any solutions on which a vote has been cast by an individual connected to our server are subsequently blocked from others on the same network. Or something like that... :-( They are only able to vote via a different route, if they go to their home computer, for instance.

  • Show Replies [+]
    Thom Feucht
    Colleagues here and at other locations have reported that they cannot vote for some of the solutions (e.g., "System Learning"). Stars will not turn from yellow to green; these individuals seem to be blocked out from at least some of the solutions. Problem has been reported the last couple days.

    • Reply
      Deepak Sil
      I tested it with Internet Explorer and Chrome browsers from my laptop with windows OS and was able to vote. Any idea what browser the user having problem with? Are they using tablet or smart phone(e.g., iPad, iPhone, etc.)?

    • Reply
      Deepak Sil
      I was also able to vote with Safari on MacBook. have not checked on smart phone or tablet.

      • Reply
        Thom Feucht
        Sorry, but the problem of folks not being able to vote persists. Another colleague from here at DOJ is able to vote on some of the solutions but not others; she seemed to be blocked from voting on those solutions that have thus far accumulated the highest number of ratings, but that's only a guess. Our IT folks wonder whether the script that blocks a single individual from voting more than once on a solution is unintentionally blocking a cadre of computers routed out through a single server. (This is beyond my expertise, however :-( . Anyway, for what's it's worth... )

  • Show Replies [+]
    Chris
    We are trying to submit a file for our response to this challenge, but we keep getting an error message. Is there a size limit or other rules governing the attachments that can be submitted? Is there an alternate submission method? Thanks!

  • In order for your submission to be considered, please ensure to submission requirements and the objective of the challenge are met. The Performance Improvement Council has received some submissions that have not met one or both of the following. * Submission requirement (500-1500 words in text or 2 1/2-7 1/2 minutes in video). * Vision of program management in 2039. (Please note that this challenge is not designed to generate solutions for today’s issues). You can refer to the ‘starter samples’ in the challenge for some ideas on how to frame a future-focused submission. Thank you! The Performance Improvement Council

  • Deepak Sil
    A link has been added under the 'Guidelines' section of the challenge. Follow the link for some great sample 'submission starters'.

  • Deepak Sil
    Some of my key take-away from the panel discussion on this challenge during the Excellence in Government conference: 1. the purpose is not to solve issues with today's program management, but to provide a vision of how program management might look like 25 years from now that would enable or hinder success of programs and program management 2. provide vision that would spark conversations 3. consider some of the key changes that can be expected. e.g., today's toddlers and teenagers are going to be the leaders and they have different mindset and expectations when compared with today's leaders; openness and availability of data across agencies; technology will enable people to achieve more; structural changes to the government; expectation from the government; etc. Good Luck to all participants.

  • Show Replies [+]
    Bethany Blakey
    This challenge was first announced at the Excellence in Government Conference on the day it launched. One member of the by-invitation-only session offered a prediction: In 2039, the prevalence of articial intelligence will mean that we need far fewer staff to manage programs. If that is true to any extent, what implications might that have for managing public sector programs in the future?

    • Reply
      Tabatha Blake
      If it is true, to any extent, that the prevalence of artificial intelligence will mean that we need far fewer staff to manage programs, then the management of public sector programs in the future will rely heavily on those few individuals who are highly efficient and skilled to process the array of data for proper management. These individuals need to be goal-oriented to guide the artificial intelligence towards ongoing growth and improvement of the public sector programs. There will also be a continuous need to timely incorporate public opinion and feedback to ensure participation and success of the programs.

Add to the Discussion

Solutions View as List
Roles, Reciprocity, and Adept Networks
7 votes, average: 3.14 out of 57 votes, average: 3.14 out of 57 votes, average: 3.14 out of 57 votes, average: 3.14 out of 57 votes, average: 3.14 out of 5 (7 votes, average: 3.14 out of 5, rated)
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In 2039, government programs will likely organize around persistent issues now in the background
The Transformation of Program Management
8 votes, average: 3.13 out of 58 votes, average: 3.13 out of 58 votes, average: 3.13 out of 58 votes, average: 3.13 out of 58 votes, average: 3.13 out of 5 (8 votes, average: 3.13 out of 5, rated)
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How Future Program Managers Will Manage Scarcity… When There Isn’t Enough Scarcity to G
Public Sector Program Management – A Vision for 2039 – Advice to Our Grandchildren
5 votes, average: 1.80 out of 55 votes, average: 1.80 out of 55 votes, average: 1.80 out of 55 votes, average: 1.80 out of 55 votes, average: 1.80 out of 5 (5 votes, average: 1.80 out of 5, rated)
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We stand on the shoulders of our parents and grandparents. Our children will one day stand on ou
25 Years and Beyond; A New Wave of Management Evolution
4 votes, average: 2.00 out of 54 votes, average: 2.00 out of 54 votes, average: 2.00 out of 54 votes, average: 2.00 out of 54 votes, average: 2.00 out of 5 (4 votes, average: 2.00 out of 5, rated)
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25 Years and Beyond; A New Wave of Management Evolution Today we rest on the cuff of
Jedi PM
7 votes, average: 3.00 out of 57 votes, average: 3.00 out of 57 votes, average: 3.00 out of 57 votes, average: 3.00 out of 57 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5 (7 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5, rated)
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Time Shares in the Tropics for All U.S. Citizens by 2039… My name is Fluke Beachwal
The Lexeme Way to Mars
66 votes, average: 4.17 out of 566 votes, average: 4.17 out of 566 votes, average: 4.17 out of 566 votes, average: 4.17 out of 566 votes, average: 4.17 out of 5 (66 votes, average: 4.17 out of 5, rated)
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In 2020, SpaceX announced it would send a team
Public Service 25 years from today – The year is 2039 – What will Public Sector Program Management Work look like? – abridged
100 votes, average: 4.61 out of 5100 votes, average: 4.61 out of 5100 votes, average: 4.61 out of 5100 votes, average: 4.61 out of 5100 votes, average: 4.61 out of 5 (100 votes, average: 4.61 out of 5, rated)
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Program management is defined as the process of managing several related projects, often with the
Crowd-Sourced Funding and a Flexible Workforce: The Future of Public Sector Program Management
9 votes, average: 3.33 out of 59 votes, average: 3.33 out of 59 votes, average: 3.33 out of 59 votes, average: 3.33 out of 59 votes, average: 3.33 out of 5 (9 votes, average: 3.33 out of 5, rated)
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In the future: Flat organizations are in; gone is the 10-layer organizational chart, where
Starting from Almost Scratch
12 votes, average: 3.25 out of 512 votes, average: 3.25 out of 512 votes, average: 3.25 out of 512 votes, average: 3.25 out of 512 votes, average: 3.25 out of 5 (12 votes, average: 3.25 out of 5, rated)
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With assistance from both the Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Department of H
Jetson’s – A Vision for the Future of Government
14 votes, average: 2.36 out of 514 votes, average: 2.36 out of 514 votes, average: 2.36 out of 514 votes, average: 2.36 out of 514 votes, average: 2.36 out of 5 (14 votes, average: 2.36 out of 5, rated)
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I am a big Jetson fan. As a child it was so fascinating to have everything or anything you want
Horizontal, Collaborative, Connections Improve Effectiveness: Crossing Career, Agency, Sector, Learning Boundaries Yields Program Results
15 votes, average: 4.00 out of 515 votes, average: 4.00 out of 515 votes, average: 4.00 out of 515 votes, average: 4.00 out of 515 votes, average: 4.00 out of 5 (15 votes, average: 4.00 out of 5, rated)
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While playing immersive Jai Alai in his basement on a Saturday morning with a competitor in Cambo
A Look Into the Future of Performance Management
14 votes, average: 3.86 out of 514 votes, average: 3.86 out of 514 votes, average: 3.86 out of 514 votes, average: 3.86 out of 514 votes, average: 3.86 out of 5 (14 votes, average: 3.86 out of 5, rated)
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In the year 2039 the children of 2014 will be the professionals in Performance Management. Youn
One Government-One Seamless Fit
21 votes, average: 4.24 out of 521 votes, average: 4.24 out of 521 votes, average: 4.24 out of 521 votes, average: 4.24 out of 521 votes, average: 4.24 out of 5 (21 votes, average: 4.24 out of 5, rated)
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One Government- One Seamless Fit The Federal Government- Year 2039 The Government o
2039: Program Management…and ROBOTS!
51 votes, average: 4.02 out of 551 votes, average: 4.02 out of 551 votes, average: 4.02 out of 551 votes, average: 4.02 out of 551 votes, average: 4.02 out of 5 (51 votes, average: 4.02 out of 5, rated)
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2039: Program Management…and ROBOTS! Click the link to download.
The Future of Program Management Employs Extreme Dispersed Teams
23 votes, average: 3.96 out of 523 votes, average: 3.96 out of 523 votes, average: 3.96 out of 523 votes, average: 3.96 out of 523 votes, average: 3.96 out of 5 (23 votes, average: 3.96 out of 5, rated)
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Elise starts her day before sunrise. She is checking on the progress of her team that is geograph
A Future Federal Program Model
8 votes, average: 3.00 out of 58 votes, average: 3.00 out of 58 votes, average: 3.00 out of 58 votes, average: 3.00 out of 58 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5 (8 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5, rated)
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The Future Federal Program Management Background The current federal program manage
Program Management in 2039, a vision
9 votes, average: 3.11 out of 59 votes, average: 3.11 out of 59 votes, average: 3.11 out of 59 votes, average: 3.11 out of 59 votes, average: 3.11 out of 5 (9 votes, average: 3.11 out of 5, rated)
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Picture a Program Manager (PM) accomplishing their job with little to no face-to-face interaction
System Learning
44 votes, average: 4.16 out of 544 votes, average: 4.16 out of 544 votes, average: 4.16 out of 544 votes, average: 4.16 out of 544 votes, average: 4.16 out of 5 (44 votes, average: 4.16 out of 5, rated)
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(Like its sister science agencies, the National Institute of Justice and Public Safety (NIJPS) is
Public Sector Program Managment success starts with Management
8 votes, average: 2.75 out of 58 votes, average: 2.75 out of 58 votes, average: 2.75 out of 58 votes, average: 2.75 out of 58 votes, average: 2.75 out of 5 (8 votes, average: 2.75 out of 5, rated)
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Looking ahead, the United States Government needs to identify that it has created it’s own
Program Management – Operations, Audit and Oversight
9 votes, average: 3.22 out of 59 votes, average: 3.22 out of 59 votes, average: 3.22 out of 59 votes, average: 3.22 out of 59 votes, average: 3.22 out of 5 (9 votes, average: 3.22 out of 5, rated)
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The challenge of Program Management in the era of Contractor Performance and Vendor Support is th
The Future of Government
8 votes, average: 2.50 out of 58 votes, average: 2.50 out of 58 votes, average: 2.50 out of 58 votes, average: 2.50 out of 58 votes, average: 2.50 out of 5 (8 votes, average: 2.50 out of 5, rated)
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Work across all sectors of business will change considerably over the next quarter of a century.
Future Program Management – Opportunities (SAMPLE SUBMISSION)
6 votes, average: 3.83 out of 56 votes, average: 3.83 out of 56 votes, average: 3.83 out of 56 votes, average: 3.83 out of 56 votes, average: 3.83 out of 5 (6 votes, average: 3.83 out of 5, rated)
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Changes are coming ‘fast and furious’. As part of envisioning future program managem
Rules

KEY DATES

  1. Submission deadline: The contest begins May 13, 2014, and all entries must be submitted by May 30, 2014 (01:59 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time).
  2. Public voting for the “Most Popular” entry begins May 13, 2014 and extends through June 06, 2014 (01:59 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time).
  3. GSA expects to announce winners in June, 2014.
  4. GSA reserves the right to extend the registration and submission period, and delay the award announcement, for any reason.

 

ELIGIBILITY

The contest is open to U.S. citizens and permanent legal residents age 18 and older at the time of registration, and private entities such as corporations and nonprofit organizations that are incorporated in and maintain a primary place of business in the United States.

Individuals entering as teams, and individuals submitting entries on behalf of corporations or other organizations, must meet the eligibility requirements of individual contestants.

All eligible individuals, teams, or other entities that submit entries that adhere to this contest’s rules are referred to as “contestants” in these rules.

The following individuals and entities are not eligible to participate:

  1. GSA employees and contractors, and members of their immediate families (spouses, children, siblings, and parents),
  2. other Federal Government employees, acting within the scope of their employment,
  3. entities involved with the production or execution of the challenge, employees of such entities, and members of their immediate families,
  4. contest judges and individuals with a familial or financial relationship with a contest judge,
  5. entities in which a contest judge is an employee, officer, director, or agent,
  6. other entities in which a contest judge has a personal or financial interest.

Final determination of contestant eligibility rests with GSA.

 

REGISTRATION AND ENTRY

All entries must be submitted through this site’s “Submit Solution” tab between April 11, 2014 and April 25, 2014 (01:59 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time).

From the “Submit Solution” tab you will be prompted for the following registration information:

  1. your name (or the team’s name for team entries),
  2. your email address (teams must enter the team leader’s email address),
  3. the title of your entry,
  4. external link to your YouTube video entry, if applicable, and
  5. the text of your submission:
    • for text-only entries: contestants are strongly encouraged to upload their entries as attachments using the site’s “Additional Files” option; however, contestants may type or paste their entries in the “Submission Text” box
    • for video entries: contestants are strongly encouraged to upload their videos’ introductory text and transcripts using the site’s “Additional Files” option; however, contestants may type or paste their introductory text and/or transcripts in the “Submission Text” box
    • for text entries with graphics: contestants must submit text entries with embedded graphics as attached files using the site’s “Additional Files” option

If entering as a team, you must submit your team leader’s name in an attached text file titled “Team Information” (or something similar) using the site’s “Additional Files” option.

 

SUBMISSION FORMAT

Contestants may submit their entries as text, a combination of text and graphics, or video.  Entries must satisfy the following maximum and minimum length requirements.  GSA will discard entries that fall outside of these bounds.

  • Text-only entries
    500 – 1,500 words, inclusive of title, footnotes, endnotes, citations, and other references
  • Text entries with graphics
    500 – 1,500 words, inclusive of text contained in graphics, titles, footnotes, endnotes, citations, and references. Text entries containing graphics must be printable at full size on no more than four single-sided 8 ½ x 11 inch sheets of paper with one inch margins
  • Video entries
    2 ½ – 7 ½ minutes of video posted to YouTube. Video entries must be supplemented with a separate document of introductory text, not to exceed 100 words, and a full written transcript. The introductory text will accompany the video’s YouTube link on the challenge web site.

To be eligible for recognition as a contest winner, contestants must submit their entries in English on the challenge site’s “Submit Solution” tab.

Contestants may submit multiple entries.

 

SELECTION OF WINNERS

Entries will be evaluated by GSA’s Performance Improvement Council staff and the panel of judges named on the contest website.  GSA is solely responsible for the selection of judges.

Judging will take place in two rounds:

  1. GSA’s Performance Improvement Council staff will review all entries and award points according to the Judging Criteria.  The ten entries with the most points will be selected as Round 1 finalists.
  2. The panel of judges named on the contest site will select the winning entries, based on the Judging Criteria, from Round 1 finalists.

 

GSA will recognize up to four entries as winners based on the points awarded by the contest’s judges.  In addition, one entry will be selected for recognition based on the votes cast by visitors to the contest website.

  • “Best Overall” entry – Judges will select a best overall entry from Round 1 finalists according to the Judging Criteria.
  • “Most Popular” entry – The entry that receives the highest average rating from among the five entries with the greatest number of votes received will be recognized as the most popular entry.
  • “Most Original Vision” – Judges may select an entry from Round 1 finalists not recognized in another category as the most original based on the criteria for “originality” outlined under Judging Criteria.
  • “Honorable Mention” – Judges may select up to two entries from Round 1 finalists not recognized in another category for honorable mention based on the same criteria used to select the best overall entry.

 

Winning entries will be recognized on the contest and GSA websites.  GSA will invite contest winners to participate in a moderated event about the future of program management, and may feature winning entries in a follow-up contest.  The contest will award no cash prizes.

Contestants conditionally selected for awards will be notified by email using the contact information provided at registration.   Final determination of contest winners is subject to verification of contestants’ eligibility and compliance with all contest rules.

GSA reserves the right to cancel the contest before announcing winners.

 

AUTHORITY

The U.S. General Services Administration is administering this challenge under authority of the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010, Section 105 (15 U.S.C. 3719).

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